Tag Archives: Beginner’s Method

PLL corner cycles (A Perm)

As I earlier posted, I’ve been learning OLLs and PLLs at a moderate pace, trying to move past the inefficiencies of the Beginner’s Method. About half-way through learning A Perm, a light bulb went off: It corner cycles the same way as the penultimate Beginner’s Method algorithm of R’ F R’ B2 R F’ R’ B2 R2 — with Aa as the far less re-grippy surrogate, and Ab (its mirror) more efficient than serial application of the Beginner’s Method algorithm. (Slowly, it’s all coming together….)

I find the A Perm one of the easier cases to recognize, with its characteristic 2x2x1 block in a top-layer corner, the block having matching colors on either side. I set up by AUF‘ing the 2x2x1 block into the front-left corner, with the 2×2 block matching the middle and bottom layers (as in the diagram to the right). If the headlights (green-xx-green in the below diagrams) are in the back, you do the Aa Perm; if the headlights are to the right, you do the Ab Perm.

A Perm (Corner Cycle)
CLOCKWISE (Aa)
(Lw’ U R’) D2 (R U’ R’) D2 (R Lw)
COUNTER-CLOCKWISE (Ab)(Lw’ R’) D2 (R U R’) D2 (R U’ Lw)

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another AIC reader conquers the cube

Another Adventures in Cubing disciple conquers the cube. A week ago, “Rhino” couldn’t solve a cube. We chatted, he spent some time with my Beginner’s Method tutorial, and he ordered a speedcube. Eight days later, he’s got a 2:21 1:27 on-camera solve (cheat-sheet free!) under his belt:

Congrats, Rhino!

The Most Spectacular, Stupendous, Sweeping, Slick, Straightforward Rubik’s Cube Tutorial the Web Has Ever Known (and Likely Ever Will Know) – Part 4 (Completing the Cube)

NOTE THAT THE OTHER PARTS OF THE TUTORIAL ARE IN PROGRESS AND WILL BE PUBLISHED SHORTLY

STEP 4: PERMUTING THE LAST LAYER (PLL)

The good student you are, you’ve now studied the Cross, First Two Layers, and OLL Beginner’s Method tutorials.  If you followed them closely, your cube should like this.  The bottom face should be all white, the top face should be all yellow, and the first two layers should be solved.  The last layer, indicated in gray, is likely to be a bit jumbled.  (There is a 1/16 chance that the previous OLL step actually solved the cube completely.)

The goal in this last step is to orient (“permute,” in cube-speak) the last layer pieces into the correct positions without disturbing the top face, bottom face, or first two layers. Continue reading

The Most Spectacular, Stupendous, Sweeping, Slick, Straightforward Rubik’s Cube Tutorial the Web Has Ever Known (and Likely Ever Will Know) – Part 3 (Complete Top Face)

NOTE THAT THE OTHER PARTS OF THE TUTORIAL ARE IN PROGRESS AND WILL BE PUBLISHED SHORTLY

STEP 3: ORIENTING THE LAST LAYER (OLL)

So, you’ve pored over my Cross and First Two Layer tutorials, and have successfully made your cube look like this?  Well done!  Believe it or not, you’ve done the hardest parts.  The next steps of completing the top face (OLL) and then correctly permuting the pieces to complete the top layer (PLL) are significantly easier.  They require a bit more memorization.  But don’t be intimidated.  I had thought that I’d never memorize these algorithms.  Now, just three months later, they are so much a part of my muscle memory that it was actually hard for me to slow down to transcribe them.

With the bottom face all white and next two layers solved, we know all of the pieces in the top layer will have yellow on them.  In this step, Continue reading

The Most Spectacular, Stupendous, Sweeping, Slick, Straightforward Rubik’s Cube Tutorial the Web Has Ever Known (and Likely Ever Will Know) – Part 2 (F2L)

NOTE THAT THE OTHER PARTS OF THE TUTORIAL ARE IN PROGRESS AND WILL BE PUBLISHED SHORTLY

under-construction

The Most Spectacular, Stupendous, Sweeping, Slick, Straightforward Rubik’s Cube Tutorial the Web Has Ever Known (and Likely Ever Will Know) – Part 1 (White Cross)

NOTE THAT THE OTHER PARTS OF THE TUTORIAL ARE IN PROGRESS AND WILL BE PUBLISHED SHORTLY

STEP 1: THE CROSS

The very first step in solving a 3×3 cube is to build a cross in the bottom layer. For purposes of this tutorial, we’ll treat the bottom layer as white (making the top layer yellow). Remember, the face color is defined by the center cubie. We’ll build the cross in two stages: first, building a daisy in the top layer with the four white edges surrounding the yellow center; second, transferring those white edges into the bottom face to create the white cross.

STEP 3a: Build a Daisy in Top Face

The goal here is to create a daisy in the top face, as shown to the right — with a yellow center cubie (capitulum) and four edges with white facing up (petals). Continue reading

The Most Spectacular, Stupendous, Sweeping, Slick, Straightforward Rubik’s Cube Tutorial the Web Has Ever Known (and Likely Ever Will Know) – Introduction

NOTE THAT THE OTHER PARTS OF THE TUTORIAL ARE IN PROGRESS AND WILL BE PUBLISHED SHORTLY

INTRODUCTION

So you want to learn to solve a Rubik’s cube?   The 4.3 quintillion possible facelet combinations may lead you to believe that completing a scrambled cube is impossible – or at least a feat attainable by only those with Herculean mental capacity.  I can attest autobiographically that the cube may be intimidating, but certainly not impossible.  Unable to solve a cube three months ago, I can now routinely solve one in under a minute, giving it nary a thought.  My wife jokes that it’s become my stressball, since I spin the faces almost subconsciously at this point as we watch TV.

Building off the very good work of several others (especially RobH0629, from whose excellent Beginner Tutorial videos I originally learned), I wanted to create a highly approachable tutorial that would demystify the cube – turning its solution from an other-worldly feat to a nearly brainless habit.  You will feel overwhelmed as you go through it, and you will ask yourself how anyone could possibly memorize all of the steps.  I asked myself the same, and was certain I’d never commit it to memory.  At this point, it’s beyond memory — it’s auto-mechanical muscle memory.

Now don’t get me wrong, I am well aware that I’m not the world’s best cuber — never will be, and, frankly, do not aspire to be.  Spend a couple minutes on youtube and you’ll find hundreds of folks who can regularly solve a cube in less than 20 seconds (never mind Feliks and his 5.6 second solve).  I do enjoy cubing, however, and I’ve found great satisfaction in teaching it to others.  Two of my friend-pupils are now competent cubers.  In two weeks, both went from not being able to solve a cube to regularly solving it in about a minute.

So, don’t sweat it.  Follow along closely, practice a lot, and you’ll be there in no time. Continue reading