Cube Patents

Every once in a while, my hobby intersects with my profession. That was the case a year ago when I wrote about the controversy between Dayan and Seven Towns over the latter’s (largely exaggerated, I believe) position that it had a copyright/trade dress claim against any cube maker using the standard yellow-white/red-orange/blue-green color scheme. And it’s the case again now, with my recent project to decorate my new office. I figured that the lawyer who deals with patents by day and speedcubes in his free time might as well have some topical art.

I downloaded a variety of cube related patents, ranging from the very first related patent of which I’m aware (from the 60s), the Japanese magnetic 2×2 patent from the 70s, the Hungarian and US Rubik patents from the early 80s, the (in)famous Verdes V-Cube patents, and the (relatively) recent Dayan ones. In Photoshop, I assembled them into a composite with the abstract pages and key diagrams, had it printed at 24×36 by Kinkos (for $4.50), and framed it (via Aaron Brothers for $35). Voila! Legal-cube-nerd art:

cube-patent-composite-25%

Click on the thumbnail to expand. I’m not convinced there’s a high demand for this sort of thing, but, just in case, here are links for downloading it:

pdf (15MB) | png (16MB) | png (50% size – 6MB)

(Again, I doubt there’s interest, but I would just ask that no-one commercialize it, and that I get credited/linked-back if anyone uses it online.)

And if the composite file isn’t enough, here’s a video. A veritable multimedia smorgasbord!

(music: “Apache,” Incredible Bongo Band)

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Family Guy / Rubik, the Amazing Cube

Huge Family Guy fan here. Who isn’t? Bad, mean, wretched people. That’s who. So color me terribly amused when I just happened upon an interview in which the show’s creator, Seth MacFarlane, goes on a rant about an ’80s Saturday morning cartoon called…wait for it…Rubik, the Amazing Cube:

They did an animated series in the ’80s that was based on the Rubik’s Cube, which was popular at the time. The premise was — I’m not making this up — that these three Hispanic children find a Rubik’s Cube, and every time they solve it, it flies and helps them solve crimes. I swear it’s real. Look it up on YouTube. It’s ridiculous.

So look it up on youtube, I did. Continue reading